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The "July Effect"

Tue, 08/02/2016 - 00:53
Every July, hospitals across the country welcome new medical graduates into their ranks. Many studies have been conducted to examine the so-called “July Effect,” the increase in negative outcomes and rates of medical errors for patients often attributed to this influx of inexperienced doctors. However, according to an article in Modern Healthcare, the “July Effect” may require further examination.
While some studies have found that there is an uptick in medical errors and patient morbidity in July, many doctors and hospitals are arguing that the “July Effect” may have little to do with recent medical graduates entering hospitals and staff turnover, and that the effect may vary by institution. One of the major studies on the “July Effect” posited: “Heterogeneity in the existing literature does not permit firm conclusions about the degree of risk posed, how changeover affects morbidity and rates of medical errors, or whether particular models are more or less problematic.”
Hospitals are staying vigilant, though. Through training programs for interns covering “everything from hand hygiene to advanced cardiac life support” and increased attention to quality and safety in orientations, hospitals are trying to combat the “July Effect,” whether real or perceived.

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) created the Clinical Learning Environment Review program in 2012 to provide feedback to hospitals on patient safety and other areas. "What we are doing as an organization is driving change by providing that information and then coming back two years later to see what's changed," states Dr. Kevin Weiss, the ACGME's senior vice president for institutional accreditation.

NAMSS 2016 Roundtable Report Now Available

Tue, 06/28/2016 - 18:57
The National Association Medical Staff Services (NAMSS) is proud to announce the release of its official report on the 2016 Roundtable: Real Reform through Positive Disruption. This event, the 3rdannual roundtable discussion convened by NAMSS, was held on Thursday, May 19, 2016 at the Gaylord National Resort in National Harbor, MD. This year’s discussion focused on enacting meaningful, impactful change in the health care provider credentialing and licensure processes. NAMSS recognizes that the time for positive disruption is now, and looks forward to continuing to work with its industry partners into the future to create more streamlined, more efficient processes that preserve patient safety.
NAMSS would again like to thank the following industry partners for participating in this important event: the American Association of Physician Assistants (AAPA), the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the American Medical Association (AMA), the Council for Affordable Quality Healthcare (CAQH), the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB), the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), The Joint Commission, Cigna, and DNV.

For a full description of this year’s Roundtable - its background, content and next steps - please click here to access the official report.

NAMSS 2016 Roundtable: Real Reform through Positive Disruption

Thu, 05/26/2016 - 19:52
As part of its ongoing efforts to work with industry leaders on meaningful reforms to the credentialing and licensure processes, the National Association Medical Staff Services (NAMSS) held its 3rd annual roundtable discussion with industry stakeholders on May 19, 2016 at the Gaylord National Resort in National Harbor, MD. This roundtable, titled Real Reform through Positive Disruption, focused on discussing what NAMSS has already accomplished in 2016, as well as beginning to build consensus on additional reforms.
In 2016, NAMSS, along with the American Hospital Association (AHA), Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and Organized Program Directors Association (OPDA), introduced a new Verification of Graduate Medical Education Training Form to alleviate the burden placed on both program directors and Medical Services Professionals (MSPs) in the training verification process. A NAMSS Task Force has also developed a Model Credentialing Application based on best practices from applications across the nation. Roundtable participants were invited to provide feedback on these documents and discuss their implementation.
Moving forward, NAMSS also proposed reforms to the recredentialing and reappointment cycle, as well as the criminal background check process. Again, roundtable participants discussed these reforms at length to identify the most effective ways to streamline the credentialing and licensure processes and reduce inefficiencies.
NAMSS will continue to work with the roundtable participants and others on an ongoing basis to implement the process improvements so direly needed in the industry. Additional information on the background and outcomes of this year’s roundtable will be available when NAMSS releases its full roundtable report in the near future. Stay tuned!

The following organizations participated in this year’s roundtable: American Association of Physician Assistants (AAPA), American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA), American Hospital Association (AHA), American Medical Association (AMA), Cigna, Council for Affordable Quality Healthcare (CAQH), DNV, Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), and The Joint Commission.